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18 November 2016
Both the Junior and Senior Schools held Remembrance Day ceremonies last Friday, 11 November.

Principal, Anne Coutts, addressed staff and students about the significance of Remembrance Day in honouring the service and sacrifice made by Australian servicemen and women.

REMEMBRANCE DAY 2016

Both the Junior and Senior Schools held Remembrance Day ceremonies last Friday, 11 November. Principal, Anne Coutts, addressed staff and students about the significance of Remembrance Day in honouring the service and sacrifice made by Australian servicemen and women.

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Anne Coutts

FROM THE PRINCIPAL

How do we learn? When I was at school (many years ago) we listened to our teachers and wrote down what they told us. There was little independent research by students, although we were encouraged to ‘read around the subject’. Learning was seen as a developing chain. A bit like a baby crawling, then toddling, then walking and running.

In a similar way when we thought about the brain, it was seen as a central organ where specific areas were responsible for each set of actions and behaviours. Now, the more we know about the brain, the more we think of it as a large music symphony played by hundreds and thousands of instruments. By mapping 10% of the brain, it is seen that 10,000 neurons and 30 million connections all work together.

Human learning is intricate and interdependent. We understand that collaborative learning is important. We encourage students to problem solve, to undertake open ended projects and begin to research and think independently. This new way of learning is vital for us to solve many of the complex problems we are facing nowadays, from decoding the brain, to understanding the vast universe. From inventing new technologies to finding ways to feed the world’s population.

“When everything is connected to everything else, for better or for worse, everything matters.”

Bruce Mau

Anne Coutts
Principal

Peter Milligan

FROM THE HEAD OF SENIOR SCHOOL

This week at the Year 10 assembly, our Careers Advisor, Dr Jessica Dietrich, gave the girls some final points of advice regarding their upcoming Work Experience placements.

Dr Dietrich spoke about asking questions to gather an understanding about possible career paths, advised students about showing initiative and encouraged taking the opportunity to explore the strategies and values of the workplace and reflect on whether you see yourself potentially finding that area of work being appealing and satisfying.

My thanks to Dr Dietrich for the significant work that goes into preparing and assisting the girls to find a placement.  This is not an easy task these days, particularly in such numbers.  Thanks also to the students for their initiative in finding a place. My thanks also on behalf of CGGS to the many parents who have offered work experience placements not only this year but over many years.

The question of work experience relevance, at the traditional Year 10 level, has been raised in many different schools – some have moved work experience to Year 9, others ask senior students to organise their own placement during one of the breaks across Year 11 or Year 12 and some have no work experience placements.

We believe there are many benefits to understanding how work environments operate beyond perhaps exploring a future career direction. The P&F have also conducted sessions for students about school - work transition as a very practical and important preparation for a different world from school. The introductory and exit or appraisal interviews are valuable experiences alone. Understanding and adapting to dress expectations, client interaction, hands-on experience, working in a team, learning new skills and meeting a range of new people are all valuable aspects of a work experience placement.

Our best wishes then go to our Year 10 students over the work placement period and because work experience then runs into their holiday break we hope they have a great break and are excited about their new education challenges in 2017. I hope the work experience will confirm for some a long-held career path passion and for others the beginnings of a connection to a vocation.

Best wishes

Peter Milligan
Head of Senior School

Angela Whitaker

FROM THE HEAD OF JUNIOR SCHOOL

If you have had a chance to walk through our playground recently you would have noticed our beautifully refurbished student garden surrounded by a white picket fence. The garden is aesthetically pleasing and potentially a rich source of learning for our students and we hope it will be widely used next school year as teaching teams continue to embed a range of concepts, including sustainability, into the curriculum. Currently our very enthusiastic gardening club is caring for the area under the direction of Ms Baines and Ms Melia and with the help of Marty who continues to make improvements to the space.

Planting and growing fruit, vegetables and flowers teach skills and builds character. Productive gardens need tending - especially watering and weeding, and all who want to benefit from the garden have a responsibility to participate in the care and upkeep of the space. Growing a garden also fosters patience as there are few instant rewards when dealing with plants that grow over days, weeks, or even a season.

School gardens provide opportunities to build and reinforce healthy eating habits. Children that usually avoid vegetables are more likely to become enthusiastic about trying foods they have grown themselves. Coupled with outdoor activity in a clean environment, gardening is a healthy pursuit.

Areas of the curriculum may be addressed through hands-on gardening. Mathematics, science, health and language are easy to integrate and rich discussions can take place prior, during and after gardening sessions. Sustainability is an ACARA cross-curriculum priority and a focus on sustainability provides opportunities for students to understand how they must learn to think and act for a more sustainable future. “This priority will allow all young Australians to develop the knowledge, skills, values and world views necessary for them to act in ways that contribute to more sustainable patterns of living. It will enable individuals and communities to reflect on ways of interpreting and engaging with the world.”

I have included some information based on data gathered in the United States around the benefits of school-based community gardens to academic achievement, physical health and social and emotional health.

  • A study of third and fourth graders involved in a school garden and nutrition program found that “the school garden supports student inquiry, connection to the natural world, and engages students in the process of formulating meaningful questions” (Habib & Doherty, 2007).
  • Students involved with school gardens generally take pleasure in learning and show positive attitudes towards education (Canaris, 1995; Dirks & Orvis, 2005).
  • Students who have school garden programs incorporated into their science curriculum score significantly higher on science achievement tests than students who are taught by strictly traditional classroom methods (Klemmer, Waliczek, & Zajicek, 2005). Physical Health
  • Children who are familiar with growing their own food tend to eat more fruits and vegetables (Bell & Dyment, 2008), and are more inclined to continue healthy eating habits through adulthood (Morris & ZidenbergCherr, 2002).
  • Gardening during childhood exposes children to healthy food, moderate exercise, and positive social interactions and can often lead to a lifetime of gardening (Gross & Lane, 2007). Social and Emotional Health
  • The school garden serves as a “safe place” for students. Studies show that large numbers of students report “that they feel ‘calm,’ ‘safe,’ ‘happy,’ and ‘relaxed’ in the school garden” (Habib & Doherty, 2007).
  • Children who work in gardens are more likely to accept people different from themselves (Dyment & Bell, 2006).
  • A study of third, fourth and fifth graders showed that students participating in a garden program had increased self-understanding, interpersonal skills, and cooperative skills when compared to non-gardening students (Robinson & Zajicek, 2005). School and Community Benefits
  • According to Skelly & Bradley (2000), teachers who worked in schools with garden programs had higher workplace morale and increased “general satisfaction with being a teacher at that school.”
  • The study by Habib and Doherty (2000) showed that “68 percent of the students shared what they were learning with family and friends unassociated with the school garden program.” This has the potential for spreading the benefits to a much larger community.
  • The American Community Gardening Association attributes community gardens to an increase in home prices for residences near the garden, a reduction in violent and non-violent crime in the neighborhood, and an overall increase in the feeling of safety (2009).
  • In a Denver study, 95 percent of community gardeners give away some of the produce they grow to friends, family and people in need; 60 percent specifically donate to food assistance programs (Litt, J.S., et al., 2012).
  • In a survey of community gardeners in Denver, 80 percent gardened as children, suggesting that gardening at a young age has a long-reaching impact (Litt, J.S., et al., 2012).
  • More than 50 percent of community gardeners meet national guidelines for fruit and vegetable intake, compared to 25 percent of non-gardeners (Litt, J.S., et al., 2011).

Angela Whitaker
Head of Junior School

Reference: http://gardens.slowfoodusa.org/contents/sdownload/3591/file/Benefits-of-School-Gardens-Denver-Urban-Gardens.pdf

Tara Dunstall

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF STUDIES

Today marks the end of Testing Week for Semester 2, 2016. Most importantly, it marks the end of formal assessment for our Year 11 and 12 students for 2016 and, for our Year 12 students, it means the end of their senior secondary education…ALMOST…

I say ALMOST, because there are a number of key events and important administrative procedures in the coming weeks.

Tuesday, 22 November

Checking Day: It is not a normal school day. Students are required to come to school to collect and check their papers and marks for the semester. Teachers will only be available at the time scheduled as most teachers have classes to teach at other times. A timetable for checking has been emailed to students.

Wednesday, 23 November

Staff and Year 12 Students’ Breakfast at 8.00am
Year 12 Chapel at 8.40am
Final House meetings from 9.10am
Mock Assembly in the Hall at 10:25am
Guard of Honor for Year 12 students at 11.00am

Thursday, 24 November to 30 November

Year 11 IB Group 4 and TOK days

Friday, 25 November

BSSS scaled scores for Semester 2 subjects will be displayed in the common room from 10.00am for all senior students.

Thursday, 1 December

Year 12 Chapel at 6.00pm
Graduation Dinner at Parliament House at 7.00pm

Wednesday, 14 December

Certificate and ATAR Collection: Year 12 BSSS students are able to collect their Year 12 Senior Secondary Certificate, academic statement and ATAR in the morning between 10.00am and 11.00am. Students have been provided with a document to complete and sign if they wish the documents to be posted to a particular address or if they authorise a named person to collect. If not, the documents will be returned to the BSSS in January for students to collect form there.

To the Year 12 students,

I would like to congratulate you on your preparation and hard work leading to this day. You have all successfully managed your academic responsibilities and your participation in the many activities which have been on offer inside and outside of CGGS. It has been a pleasure teaching many of you over the last six years as well as getting to know you better in my role as Director of Studies. I wish you happiness and success in the pursuit of your dreams and goals.

Mrs Dunstall
Director of Studies

1 January

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As an International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Programme (PYP) school, we aim to encourage the quality of “international mindedness” in our students.

This year, the inaugural International Mindedness Committee conducted a survey with students from Year 3 to Year 6 to answer this fundamental question – exactly what do we mean by “international mindedness”?

WHAT IS INTERNATIONAL MINDEDNESS?18 November

As an International Baccalaureate (IB) Primary Years Programme (PYP) school, we aim to encourage the quality of “international mindedness” in our students. This year, the inaugural International Mindedness Committee conducted a survey with students from Year 3 to Year 6 to answer this fundamental question – exactly what do we mean by “international mindedness”?

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This semester Year 9 Commerce classes have been learning what it is like to run a small business. Last week this study culminated in them holding market day stalls at lunch times.

The students undertook market research and completed a budgeting assessment task as part of the project. Most stalls made a profit with the proceeds going to a chosen charity.

TO MARKET, TO MARKET!18 November

This semester Year 9 Commerce classes have been learning what it is like to run a small business. Last week this study culminated in them holding market day stalls at lunch times. The students undertook market research and completed a budgeting assessment task as part of the project. Most stalls made a profit with the proceeds going to a chosen charity.

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Canberra Girls Grammar School’s dominance on the netball court is set to continue well into the future with some of our younger students developing their skills through the NetSetGO program.

Wednesday evenings at the Deakin netball courts are the place to be for this group of enthusiastic students as they practice skill activities, minor games, music, dance and modified matches in a fun and safe environment.

FUTURE NETBALL STARS HIT THE COURT18 November

Canberra Girls Grammar School’s dominance on the netball court is set to continue well into the future with some of our younger students developing their skills through the NetSetGO program. Wednesday evenings at the Deakin netball courts are the place to be for this group of enthusiastic students as they practice skill activities, minor games, music, dance and modified matches in a fun and safe environment.

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Congratulations to our Year 10 PDHPE students who have recently completed their Bronze Medallion Swimming and Water Safety qualification.

The course included a number of water safety and lifesaving skills plus a CPR qualification update. The girls were proactive in their endeavours, demonstrating a range of physical competencies in and out of the water.

WATER SAFETY SKILLS REWARDED18 November

Congratulations to our Year 10 PDHPE students who have recently completed their Bronze Medallion Swimming and Water Safety qualification. The course included a number of water safety and lifesaving skills plus a CPR qualification update. The girls were proactive in their endeavours, demonstrating a range of physical competencies in and out of the water.

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Avoid the back to school rush in January 2017!

The School Shop will open during the week commencing Monday 21 November 2016. This appointment week is specifically for new students commencing in 2017.

SPECIAL SCHOOL SHOP APPOINTMENT WEEK4 November

Avoid the back to school rush in January 2017! The School Shop will open during the week commencing Monday 21 November 2016. This appointment week is specifically for new students commencing in 2017.

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In case you were wondering, we do baptisms, weddings and funerals for Grammarians in the Chapel of the Annunciation. On the weekend we baptised Elodie Chan, daughter of Melissa Bessel  (1988) and Rex Chan.

CHAPEL NEWS18 November

In case you were wondering, we do baptisms, weddings and funerals for Grammarians in the Chapel of the Annunciation. On the weekend we baptised Elodie Chan, daughter of Melissa Bessel (1988) and Rex Chan.

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Lucy Hincksman (Year 6) represented the ACT in the U12 National Touch Football Championships in Mandurah, WA. The team won the bronze medal and Lucy received the ACT Rising Star Award for her commitment and impressive individual and team play.

STUDENT ACHIEVEMENTS18 November

Lucy Hincksman (Year 6) represented the ACT in the U12 National Touch Football Championships in Mandurah, WA. The team won the bronze medal and Lucy received the ACT Rising Star Award for her commitment and impressive individual and team play.

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Over the weekend of 11–13 November the class of 1986 had their thirty year reunion, their second for the year as not all members of the cohort were able to attend the first reunion over the founders’ Day Weekend in May.

Many celebrations were had over the 3 days at various venues around Canberra including the National Press Club in Barton and Little Brooklyn in Kingston as well as a Heritage Walk and morning tea at Canberra Girls Grammar School on the Sunday.

GRAMMARIANS’ NEWS18 November

Over the weekend of 11–13 November the class of 1986 had their thirty year reunion, their second for the year as not all members of the cohort were able to attend the first reunion over the founders’ Day Weekend in May. Many celebrations were had over the 3 days at various venues around Canberra including the National Press Club in Barton and Little Brooklyn in Kingston as well as a Heritage Walk and morning tea at Canberra Girls Grammar School on the Sunday.

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